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  • I've Found the Job Where I Fit Best. Find Your War Job in Industry - Agriculture - Business by Rapp, George
    Rapp, George
    I've Found the Job Where I Fit Best. Find Your War Job in Industry - Agriculture - Business

    Washington, DC: Office of War Information, 1943. 22-1/4 by 16 inches. OWI Poster no. 55. Poster depicting a woman in a headscarf and uniform operates a machine, perhaps a lathe. Despite the vast number of posters issued by government agencies during the Second World War, this is one of the few depicting women doing traditionally male jobs, like manufacturing. Not much has been written about the artist, but he produced many magazine and advertising illustrations. ISBN: 281AIB1017649.

    Small bit of loss to one corner, else a fine, bright example. Folded twice, for mailing, as issued. Laid down on a stiff, archival paper backing. [JSP02; JSP04]

    Book ID: 78833
    View cart More details Price: $400.00
  • The Sacred Well of Chichen Itza by Garcia, Rupert
    Garcia, Rupert
    The Sacred Well of Chichen Itza

    San Francisco State College, 1971. Three-color silkscreen poster, 20 by 26 inches, promoting an exhibition of the art of ancient Mexico during the Sixth Annual Raza/Hispanidad Festival. Signed in pencil by Garcia below the central image. Rupert Garcia Print and Posters, 1967-1990, catalogue raisonne no. 34. Edition of approximately 75 copies. ISBN: 281AIB1017930.

    Two thumb-tack holes in the upper margin, surface loss in a small area of the lower margin, probably from tape removal, thus a very good copy. [webonly] [JSP01; JSP04]

    Book ID: 80062
    View cart More details Price: $1,250.00
  • Freedom Mean Vote for Aaron Henry
    Freedom Mean Vote for Aaron Henry

    [Jackson, MS?]: [Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party], [1964]. Photographic poster, 10-3/8 by 16-3/8 inches. At the 1964 Democratic National Convention, in Atlantic City, delegates from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MDFP) challenged the all-white delegation from Mississippi claiming segregationists had prevented African Americans from voting in the primaries. The MFDP went a step further, arguing that it had selected delegates according to Democratic rules and that the MFDP's integrated delegation was therefore the legitimate convention delegation. Ultimately, Democratic Party leaders and the MFDP worked out a compromise that allowed the delegation to stay, mostly as non-voting guests, and the Democratic Party promised that the 1968 convention would not accept delegations elected without African American voters. Many white Democrats from the…

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    [Jackson, MS?]: [Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party], [1964]. Photographic poster, 10-3/8 by 16-3/8 inches. At the 1964 Democratic National Convention, in Atlantic City, delegates from the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MDFP) challenged the all-white delegation from Mississippi claiming segregationists had prevented African Americans from voting in the primaries. The MFDP went a step further, arguing that it had selected delegates according to Democratic rules and that the MFDP's integrated delegation was therefore the legitimate convention delegation. Ultimately, Democratic Party leaders and the MFDP worked out a compromise that allowed the delegation to stay, mostly as non-voting guests, and the Democratic Party promised that the 1968 convention would not accept delegations elected without African American voters. Many white Democrats from the South walked out of the convention, marking the beginning of the Southern embrace of the Republication Party.

    Following the convention, the MFDP continued its campaign, scheduling a "freedom ballot" on the same day as the presidential election. It was an opportunity for disenfranchised African Americans to practice voting. The MFDP nominated Lyndon Johnson as president, Hubert Humphrey as vice-president, Mississippi NAACP leader Aaron Henry for senate, Fannie Lou Hamer for US Congress in the 2nd District, Annie Devine in the 4th, and Victoria Gray in the 5th.

    The MFDP printed posters for all six candidates, and they are scarce today. A key and iconic item from the Civil Rights Movement. ISBN: 281AIB1045117.

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    Minor wear and tanning. Generally very good or better. [JSP01; JHG2019]

    Book ID: 233380
    View cart More details Price: $850.00
  • Leonard Crow Dog, Medicine Man. We Are Still Here by Davis, Paul
    Davis, Paul
    Leonard Crow Dog, Medicine Man. We Are Still Here

    1977. Four color poster, 27 by 40 inches. Crow Dog, an Ogala Sioux, was a prominent member of the American Indian Movement, and a strong advocate for reestablishing Native American spiritual traditions as well as securing civil rights for the indigenous peoples of the United States. The poster was probably issued to promote the documentary Crow Dog. No holdings in OCLC. ISBN: 281AIB1017929.

    A fine copy. [JSP01; JSP04]

    Book ID: 80059
    View cart More details Price: $350.00
  • HHH Si! Si! Si! by United Farm Workers
    United Farm Workers
    HHH Si! Si! Si!

    [Delano, CA?]: [United Farm Workers], [1968]. Original screenprint poster, 20 by 14 inches. The UFW supported Hubert Humphrey in the 1968 presidential election and adopted a slogan based on his triple-H initials: HHH Si! Si! Si!. This poster combines the slogan with the UFW eagle printed in the colors of the Mexican flag: green shading into red on a white background. The pinback buttons from this campaign are common; the poster is not. ISBN: 281AIB0111875.

    Fine. [webonly]

    Book ID: 74054
    View cart More details Price: $150.00
  • Wilson, Wes
    Jefferson Airplane / Grateful Dead (BG-17-RP-3)

    [San Francisco]: Bill Graham, [1966]. 14 by 20 inches. Third printing with upsidedown #17 in right margin. Blue on back (verso). ISBN: 281AIB0138870.

    Light creases to top corners, else fine.

    Book ID: 63672
    Keywords: Music History, Poster
    View cart More details Price: $95.00
  • Spring Anti-War Games 1971 by Ginsberg, Allen
    Ginsberg, Allen
    Spring Anti-War Games 1971

    Washington, DC: (n.p.), 1971. Broadside poster, 11 by 17 inches. A poem published in the form of a poster for a May Day protest in Washington, DC, May 1 through 7, 1971. The first separate appearance of this poem, which ran in Quicksilver Times, March 17, 1971; it was later collected in Ginsberg Verbatim. Uncommon. Morgan, The Works of Allen Ginsberg, AA16. Two copies on OCLC (Northwestern, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill). ISBN: 281AIB1014451.

    Printed with purple ink on light blue paper. Light, uneven toning, mostly at the top half; four horizontal creases from folding.

    Book ID: 66862
    View cart More details Price: $200.00
  • Needed (Public Citizen #1. President of the United States in Exile. Inaugurated 3-4-69) by [Gregory, Dick]
    [Gregory, Dick]
    Needed (Public Citizen #1. President of the United States in Exile. Inaugurated 3-4-69)

    1969. 17-1/2 by 22-1/2 inches. Black-and-white poster with two mugshot-style portraits of Gregory with the word Needed below in large type. In 1968, Dick Gregory, an African American comedian and civil rights activist, ran a write-in campaign for president under the Freedom and Peace party banner (this was a splinter group from the Peace and Freedom party). Gregory ran with three different Vice Presidential candidates, Mark Lane (JFK conspiracy theorist), the pediatrician Benjamin Spock, and the journalist David Frost. Presaging Steven Colbert's comedic involvement in politics, the very idea that Gregory, a black man, might run for president was a joke in itself at the time. He garnered some 48,000 votes (according to Wikipedia, so how can that be wrong?)…

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    1969. 17-1/2 by 22-1/2 inches. Black-and-white poster with two mugshot-style portraits of Gregory with the word Needed below in large type. In 1968, Dick Gregory, an African American comedian and civil rights activist, ran a write-in campaign for president under the Freedom and Peace party banner (this was a splinter group from the Peace and Freedom party). Gregory ran with three different Vice Presidential candidates, Mark Lane (JFK conspiracy theorist), the pediatrician Benjamin Spock, and the journalist David Frost. Presaging Steven Colbert's comedic involvement in politics, the very idea that Gregory, a black man, might run for president was a joke in itself at the time. He garnered some 48,000 votes (according to Wikipedia, so how can that be wrong?) and then staged a mock inaguration in Washington, DC, as President in Exile, promising to set up a "Black House", to counter the Nixon White House. Mark Lane took the oath as Vice President by phone. This poster was issued in conjunction with that event. See Jet Magazine, March 20, 1969. ISBN: 281AIB1023434.

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    Fine.

    Book ID: 103846
    Keywords: Black Studies, Poster
    View cart More details Price: $375.00
  • Fuel for Them... Means Less for You [poster] by Lent, George F.
    Lent, George F.
    Fuel for Them... Means Less for You [poster]

    [N.-pl.]: Chamberlin Metal Weather Strip Co. for the United States Govt, [n.d. but ca. 1942-1945]. 17.25 by 22 inches. A central red, white, and blue V depicts a rifle-carrying soldier alongside a tank, with airplanes in the sky. To the left and right of the V are homefront industrial scense rendered in a muted blue. Below is the following text: "Make Your Home Heat Tight Now! 1. Install weather strip insulation; 2. Put up storm windows and doors; 3. Calk air leaks around window frames; 4. Install attic and wall insulation; 5. Save coal, oil, and gas for war." One of many conservation-oriented propaganda posters produced during the Second World War. ISBN: 281AIB0134786.

    Two old folds, probably for mailing; a tiny bit of loss in the upper left corner; else a near fine, bright example mounted on linen.

    Book ID: 61048
    Keywords: Poster, WWII
    View cart More details Price: $125.00
  • A Stitch in Time Saves Nine! [poster] by Hungerford, Cyrus C.
    Hungerford, Cyrus C.
    A Stitch in Time Saves Nine! [poster]

    Pittsburgh, PA: (n.p.), 1941. Roughly 14.25 by 22 inches. Offset lithographed poster. Text: "This kid is getting first aid in a hurry! The same rule applies to employees!! A cut finger, smashed toe, sore eye, banged head or a cough may not seem bad at the time, but it may put you in the hospital! Don't neglect it! See the 'doc'! You are a production soldier...America's first line of defense is here." Hungerford was an editorial cartoonist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for fifty years (1927-1977). This is one of a series of workplace propaganda posters he did in the year leading up to the United States' entry into the Second World War. ISBN: 281AIB0134743.

    A very good example. Upper right corner repaired (paper fill); left margin slightly trimmed, mounted on linen. An attractive copy.

    Book ID: 61050
    Keywords: Postcards, Poster
    View cart More details Price: $125.00
  • "Lumber Is a Critical Material in Our Whole War Program" [poster]
    "Lumber Is a Critical Material in Our Whole War Program" [poster]

    Washington, DC: Lumber and Timber Products War Committee, [n.d. but 1942-1945]. Roughly 21.25 by 28.25 inches. Offset lithograph printed in red and blue. The poster attributes the title quote to Donald Nelson, the chairman of the War Production Board. The legend at the bottom of the poster reads, "Give him a hand...Boost production. Let's go now!" As the publisher was a lobbying arm of the National Lumber Manufacturers Association (now the National Forest Products Association) and the main image is a heroic portrait of Nelson, the real purpose of this poster seems to be currying favor with the War Production Board and not encouraging lumberjacks to work harder. ISBN: 281AIB0134816.

    Mounted on linen and virtually flawless.

    Book ID: 61045
    Keywords: Postcards, Poster
    View cart More details Price: $125.00